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HOW WE SUNK THE TRUCK AT THE GREAT MABABE DEPRESSION By Allan and Mira Culham

  Allan and Mira

Allan and Mira Culham

The story of our drive through Northern Botswana starts with a footnote from a travel guide.

("NOTE: This is only a suggested route and some areas are not accessible during the Okavango's wet season when the water reaches far into the Moremi and floods many of the roads. Please check with Botswana travel experts regarding the conditions at the time of your planned self drive safari." From "Safarico - Africa Travel Made Easy".)

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GOLFING THE ROYAL COURSES By Global Golfer (Article)

 

stockwell july 2017

David Stockwell

Playing the "Royals"
(© by the Global Golfer. Article should not be sold or distributed without the permission of the author)


Actually there are no "Royal" golf courses because the right to use the
prefix "Royal" is granted by the British Monarch to golf societies (2:
Perth and Burgess in Scotland) and to golf clubs (64) not to golf
courses. Two of these 66 play on municipal courses and the most
famous, the Royal & Ancient, uses the Old Course for most of its
competitions.

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FISHING WITH YOUR GRANDCHILDREN By Bill Kilfoyle


 

 

 

Bill Kilfoyle

There are some things that should be passed on to your grandchildren - like the fun to be had in an afternoon of fishing. I’m thinking of kids, say 6 to 11 years old. I can still remember the first fish my daughter caught - and so can she!

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SURVIVAL IN BOLIVIA By Jack Derksen (Article)

Jack D july 2017 copy

Jack Derksen

A SANTA CRUZ SURVIVOR

For some years Santa Cruz motorists using the 4th ring road have had to cross a major canal on a narrow, dirt covered provisional bridge. Two lanes of traffic crossing a one lane bridge leads to complications.

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CRUSHER WINS THE COLD WAR By John Lang (Article)

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 John Lang

p> While at UBC in the early 60s I spent my summers as an employee of the Standard Oil Company. In those pre-self-service days, every car that drove into a Standard Oil gas station had its windshield washed, tire pressure checked, under-the-hood examined. We wore white uniforms, including a wedge cap. As a part-timer, my job was mostly at the front end, serving customers at the pumps, but I also did my fair share of lube jobs, tire repairs, lot sweeping and rest-room cleaning. I was a ‘floater’, assigned to stations in the Vancouver area as needed, and thus had the opportunity to meet most of the full-time employees in Standard’s Vancouver gas station empire. They were a fine lot of fellows, generous, hard-working, helpful and funny. I often think of them and wonder what became of them.

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WRESTLING THE HURRICANE By Jim Midwinter (Article)

Jim Midwinter

A MARINER'S ADVENTURE

The voyage began auspiciously enough, even joyously: my birthday, my last day in the Public Service of Canada, and my last day as ambassador to Venezuela. We (my wife, Sally, and 1) had a glorious send-off from the elegant Caraballeda Yacht Club where we had been privileged to be honourary members during our tour of duty in that South American republic. A spirited gathering of staff and other friends; then, as prearranged, we cast off just as the sun dipped below the horizon.

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ALL RHODES LEAD TO ROME By Roger Lucy (Article)

Roger Lucy

All Rhodes Lead to Rome - a Middle Power’s Course Through a Uni-polar World

The following is an object lesson to what happens to smaller states that wittingly or not ruffle the feathers of the super-power of the day.

In the mid-second century BC, the Greek historian Polybius, an enforced guest of the Romans, chronicled how, in the space of half a century, Rome came to dominate the Oekumenie, the known world.

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