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EXERCISE: A PROGRAM YOU CAN STAY ON By Brian Northgrave (Article)

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Brian Northgrave

Only since WWII have the benefits of exercise started to be understood. It has now been proven to prevent heart attacks, to prolong life, to prolong quality of life, to reduce risks of cancer, diabetes, depression and more. An expert recently said that exercise is the best treatment for, or to defer, dementia.

We know all this, but we know that we now have, for the first time, a society that is fundamentally sedentary.

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PESTICIDE REGULATIONS SHORTCOMINGS By Jean Cottam (Article)

 

Jean Cottam

An ever increasing number of Canadian municipalities are now protected by pesticide bylaws and Québec Pesticide Code, by-passing our faulty federal pesticide regulatory system, which relies on undisclosed data provided by the industry and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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A PESTICIDE BY-LAW? By Jean Cottam (Article)

Jean Cottam

On April 23, 2004 the Ontario College of Family Physicians (OCFP) announced the completion of their evaluation of peer-reviewed literature on pesticides. The twelve-year review revealed “comprehensive links to serious illnesses, such as cancer, reproductive problems and neurological diseases.” (See http://www.ocfp.on.ca.) Among effects on children were growth retardation, birth defects and fetal death. The elderly were found to be more at risk of developing Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s and Alzheimer’s diseases and the young to suffer from autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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SISTERS OF CHARITY By Bob Burchill (Article)

 

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Bob Burchill

A common experience on retirement is the realization that you have far more clothes,at least of a particular kind, than you are likely to need ever again. Those considering excess attire disposal have many options, including donation to Neighborhood Services and The Salvation Army. May I suggest that you give some thought to The Sisters of Charity, an organization that has maintained a fine tradition of benevolence and generosity in Ottawa since that great life force, Elizabeth Bruyere, established the order here many years ago.

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LAWN INFESTATIONS BY GRUBS By Jean Cottam (Article)

LAWN INFESTATIONS BY GRUBS: USE OF MERIT O.5 G INSECTICIDE (IMIDACLOPRID)

Written by K. Jean Cottam, PhD Wednesday, 17 August 2005

Grubs of several beetle species eat grass roots, sometimes actually killing patches of turf that can be rolled back. Birds, raccoons and skunks feast on these spring-time delicacies. The surviving grubs eventually pupate and emerge as beetles, to mate and lay eggs back in the turf, completing the ageless cycle. Homeowners may be alarmed by these temporary foragers, and use toxic chemicals to “protect their lawn”. This author encountered some grub infestations on her front lawn on two occasions, but did absolutely nothing to get rid of them. This turf was essentially healthy and tight, and healed itself without any kind of intervention on my part.

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DOGS AND EXPOSURE TO HERBICIDE 2,4-D By Jean Cottam (Article)

DOGS AND EXPOSURE TO HERBICIDE 2,4-D
By K. Jean Cottam, PhD

“On December 8, 2003 Nova, my two-year-old puppy, was diagnosed with lymphoma,” wrote Adrienne Beattie, “which came on quickly and aggressively, causing her spleen and liver to become enlarged, the development of anemia, a loss of weight, fatigue, weakness, coughing, sore joints, growth on abdomen, intestines, lungs, and liver, as well as swollen lymph nodes. Nova became weak and died on December 30, 2003.”(1)

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OTTAWA ELECTIONS & PESTICIDES By Jean Cottam

CITY OF OTTAWA MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS OF 2006 AND PESTICIDES

By K. Jean Cottam

As a grandmother of two young children in Kanata, I am very concerned about my grandchildren’s potential exposure to toxic chemicals used for cosmetic purposes. U.S. independent scientists suggest that children may be one hundred times as vulnerable as adults are when exposed to pesticides. Our children are increasingly afflicted with cancer, birth defects, impaired physical development, autism and attention deficit. On the other hand, we are all subjected to all kinds of chemicals that are bound to interact. However, Health Canada does not take into account any cumulative or combined exposures.

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A PESTICIDE LAW FOR OTTAWA IN 2007 By Jean Cottam (Article)

Jean Cottam

PESTICIDE-FREE LAWN MAINTENANCE,

Ottawa is lagging behind 127 Canadian municipalities that have adopted a pesticide bylaw for cosmetic purposes. Now that we have elected a  new City Council, the upcoming new campaign for Ottawa's pesticide bylaw will be spearheaded by both the Canadian Cancer Society and well-informed medical specialists.

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ONTARIO'S COSMETIC PESTICIDES BAN ACT - AN UPDATE - By K. Jean Cottam



BILL 64: ONTARIO'S COSMETIC PESTICIDES BAN ACT
by K. Jean Cottam

Before the 2008 spring session of the provincial parliament was
prorogued for the summer, Ontario MPPs passed Bill 64 intended to update
the regulations pertaining to cosmetic use of pesticides throughout
Ontario. Meanwhile, the Ministry of Environment had provided a
questionnaire on its website welcoming comment on the matter by the
general public.

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ACCOMMODATION FOR SENIORS By Terry Colfer (Article)

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Terry Colfer

Accommodation For Seniors

When I volunteered to write an article on accommodation for seniors in the Ottawa region I began with the vivid memory of my sister, brother and me attempting to find suitable accommodation for our father in the Montreal area. This happened a few years ago when, at 88 years young, it was time for our dad to move from his apartment to a seniors’ residence. Quite frankly, it was a challenging and frustrating task. Amongst other things, we had trouble finding the appropriate material so that we could properly identify the options.

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